The following 30 PJJM courses were developed during the course of the Award 2007-JL -FX-0019.

PJJM (Core Course) - Are You Sure You Really Want To Be a Supervisor?

Course Description
This course is designed to provide an overview of the role, duties, and responsibilities of the supervisor who oversees the work of line staff. Issues such as training, monitoring, performance appraisal, and discipline will be discussed. The techniques for establishing a work climate that supports employee productivity and growth will be reviewed, along with personal and individual values and beliefs that affect worker performance. Problems associated with being a newly appointed supervisor will be addressed. A list of critical competencies of a supervisor will be presented.

Learning Objectives

  • Define “supervisor.”
  • Identify the role of a supervisor as a trainer.
  • List at least 3 factors that contribute to a productive work climate.
  • Identify at least 3 activities of a supervisor that enhance staff performance.
  • Define 5 supervisory styles of behavior.
  • List 3 critical functions of supervision.
  • Identify at least 3 problems confronting a newly appointed supervisor.
  • List at least 5 critical competencies of an effective supervisor.

PJJM (Core Course) - Lifecycle of an Employee

Course Description
Applying an understanding the arc of Employee Lifecycles and the Four Stages in a Job or Career can help Juvenile Justice Managers take charge of their own development and accelerate advancement. Using the Four Stages in a Job or Career can enable managers to coach more effectively, mentor subordinates, and get the greatest return on their organization’s human capital investment. In Module Two, you will learn to calculate the financial consequences of employee turnover.

Learning Objectives

  • Determine and define where you are in the cycle and how you can use this course to make progress toward your career goals.
  • Use the Turnover Cost Calculator to calculate costs associated with specific job replacements.
  • Identify the three ways managers can minimize the costs of turnover.
  • Plan how your organization might improve the effectiveness of its hiring efforts by applying Competency Modeling and Behavioral Event Interviewing.
  • Identify specific Competencies related to your job.
  • Explain differences between traditional interviewing and Behavioral Event Interviewing.
  • Create samples of S-A-R interviewing questions.
  • Study the Situational Leadership Model; compare and contrast to your own predominant leadership style.
  • Describe differences between Task behaviors and People behaviors, self-assess your current capabilities in each, and create your own Individual Development Plan for improvement.

 


PJJM (Core Course) - Report Writing

Course Description

This course is designed to assist the new probation/parole officer with the basic concepts of effective report writing and can serve as a refresher for experienced officers. Successful writing of reports and the completion of forms according to the policies and procedures of the agency serve as historical records of events, transactions, and occurrences. If not recorded completely and in a timely manner, the writer inevitably will have a memory lapse. Proper report writing can serve the writer well when testimony in court is required. This course will deal with the Seven (7) Essentials, and Five (5) Requirements of effective writing. Common errors in report writing will also be reviewed.

Learning Objectives

  • Define what is meant by a report
  • Explore the significance of Critical Incidents
  • Identify the Seven Essentials of a report
  • Identify the Five Requirements of a report
  • Identify why reports are utilized in court proceedings
  • List at least five hints for effective report writing
  • List at least three historical factors that affect the writing of investigative reports in probation/parole.


PJJM (Core Course) - Staff Supervision and Staff Development

Course Description

Staff Supervision and Staff Development is an introductory and core course in the PJJM curriculum. It is a required course for a certificate in the PJJM Program. This online course focuses on the requirements of new and current supervisors in the juvenile justice field. Special emphasis is placed on the Probation and Corrections Manager who is the link pin to the administrative component of the organization. These supervisors interface with the direct service staff. Becoming a supervisor is a difficult task, and requires realigning oneself from previous co-workers to the team leader and management. This course will provide core curriculum required of all beginning and current supervisors in the juvenile justice field.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand and describe their role in staff supervision and staff development.
  • Apply the conditions to effective teaching and learning, as well as adult learning principles in the supervision of employees.
  • Explain the differences between human resources management, staff supervision and staff development, staff motivational leadership and staff performance management.
  • Understanding the barriers to effective teaching and adult learning in staff supervision.
  • Understanding the characteristics of effective learner behaviors.
  • Understand and describe the significance of the supervisee and supervisor relationship for staff supervision and staff development.
  • Draft an outline explaining how to apply what they have learned in the course and how what has been learned can be applied to their organization.

PJJM - Assessment and Treatment of The Adolescent Sexual Offender
Teacher: Henry R. Cellini, Ph.D., LPCC.

Course Description
This course is a basic overview of the field of Sexual Offender Treatment as it impacts the adolescent and youthful offender.  A special focus in the course will be placed on the impact of the Adam Walsh Act on the criminal justice practitioner.  This objective will be met by the examination of selected issues confronting the criminal justice system today including criminalization of sexual behavior, risk diagnosis and screening, re-entry concerns, trauma issues, mental health concerns, long-term effects of abuse, program design, implementation and evaluation.  Other key concerns revolving around the Adolescent Sexual Offender like registration, notification, risk of recidivism and transition issues to young adulthood will arise and be discussed.

Learning Objectives

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the risk factors associated with juvenile sex offenders’ delinquency.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the social and educational characteristics of chronic and serious youth sex offenders, including those with special education needs.
  • Critically evaluate different juvenile justice programs as to their effectiveness with juvenile sex offenders. This includes: (a) the adequacy of the research and knowledge base; (b) the range of applicability; (c) the value and ethical issues, including the youth's own value system; and (d) the policy implications involved in delivery of mental health services to juvenile sex offenders.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how to adapt juvenile justice program models and strategies to meet the unique needs of persons from diverse backgrounds, including race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, physical or mental ability, developmental level, age and national origin.
  • Describe how probation and parole sanctions imposed on juveniles with sexual offender concerns predict short term and long term life outcomes.
  • Understand how child physical, sexual, emotional abuse and trauma impacts the relationship to lifelong mental health issues.
  • Understand the implementation of the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA) on the juvenile justice practitioner. 

 


PJJM - Avoiding Burnout
Teacher: Zakiya Khalfani

Course Description
Burnout is a state of emotional and physical exhaustion caused by excessive and prolonged stress. It can occur when you feel overwhelmed and unable to meet constant demands. As the stress continues, you begin to lose the interest or motivation that led you to take on a certain role in the first place. Burnout reduces your productivity and saps your energy, leaving you feeling increasingly hopeless, powerless, cynical, and resentful. The unhappiness burnout causes can eventually threaten your job, your relationships, and your health. At the conclusion of this course, the student will be able to identify the signs and symptoms of burnout, causes of burnout, and how to respond to burnout. We will examine the differences between stress and burnout. Finally, the student will be provided with techniques to reduce the potential for workplace burnout.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the signs and symptoms of burnout.
  • Recognize the difference between burnout and stress.
  • Identify the causes of burnout and who may be at risk.
  • Analyze the causes of job burnout and ways to mitigate it.

PJJM - Budgets and The Budgeting Process: Marshalling the Resources to Accomplish Your Mission
Teacher: Louis G. Biondi, MBPA

Course Description
This course is concerned with providing the student with an understanding of the purpose of a budget and the budgeting process. It identifies the components of a budget and describes their relationship. It will discuss the differences between a capital budget and an operating budget and will discuss the relationship between the budgeting and planning process. The differences between budgets developed by publicly owned organizations and government organizations will be described, as will the differences between budgets developed for organizations that produce goods and organizations that deliver services. There is also a discussion of the role a budget plays in measuring performance of an organization. Key steps in developing and managing a budget for a government organization whose primary role is to deliver services are suggested.

 Learning Objectives

  • Define the purpose of a budget
  • Define the difference between a capital budget and an operating budget
  • Identify the components of a budget and describe their relationship
  • Identify the relationship between the budgeting and planning process
  • Explain the key differences between budgets developed by publicly owned organizations and government organizations
  • Explain the differences between budgets developed for organizations that produce goods and organizations that deliver services
  • Explain the role a budget plays in measuring performance of an organization
  • Define the key steps in gaining budget approval
  • Define the key steps in developing and managing a budget for a government organization whose primary role is to deliver services

PJJM - Case Planning
Teacher: Melissa Pitts-Cutler

Course Description
This lesson on case planning describes how the corrections professional should go about developing a case plan for a client. The process draws from the most contemporary theories available, incorporating treatment principles rooted in evidence-based practices and delivered with a cognitive-behavioral approach. To gain the most benefit from this course, the student should have completed the courses titled “evidence-based practices” and “risk­–needs assessment” before beginning the case planning course. Case planning will take the student through a process of clear steps, outlining the specific and required elements necessary for developing an effective plan designed to provide guidance, structure, accountability, and change in a client. Its delivery and monitoring also include specific requirements of the staff member. It is vital that treatment staff recognize that their attitude and approach to the client and the plan is just as critical as the client’s attitude.

Learning Objectives
  • The student will learn the stages of change theory as a foundation to case planning.
  • The student will understand the purpose of a risk–needs assessment.
  • The student will learn how to develop a behavior contract.
  • The student will understand that case planning is a fluid process that requires the flexibility and continual involvement both of staff and the client.
  • The student will be able to identify the six nationally recognized criminogenic needs.
  • The student will understand the core elements of a case plan.
  • The student will know the five steps to problem-solving.

PJJM - Classification and Risk Assessment in Criminal Justice - The Cornerstone of Managing Risk
Teacher: Peggy Conway

Course Description
This course is designed to provide an introduction into role of risk assessment in supervising offenders and defendants. The evolution of risk assessment tools from the first through the fifth generation is discussed within the context of risk management. Issues such as tool section, validation and norming will be presented. Current thinking on future improvements needed in risk assessment and management are also explored.

Learning Objectives

  • List at least 3 ways risk assessment scores are used
  • Define subjective versus objective risk assessment.
  • Identify dynamic versus static needs.
  • Understand the key attributes of that distinguish between 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th generation tools
  • Describe the validation process and why it is important.

PJJM - Coaching
Teacher: Zakiya Khalfani

Course Description
Coaching is partnering with clients in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires them to maximize their personal and professional potential. A coaching partnership supports the achievement of extraordinary results, based on goals set by the individual or team. Through the process of coaching, individuals concentrate on the skills and actions needed to successfully produce their personally relevant results. Coaching accelerates the individual’s or team’s progress by providing greater attention and awareness of possibilities, leading to more effective choices. Coaching examines where individuals are now and what they are willing to do to get where they want to be in the future. Coaches recognize that results are a matter of the individual’s or team’s intentions, choices, and actions, supported by the coach’s efforts and application of coaching skills, approaches, and methods. This course will provide the participant with an introduction to best-selling author Tom Crane’s The Heart of Coaching. From this work, you will learn the Transformational Coaching process. This process provides a useful framework to guide performance-coaching discussions in ways that open up communications and build trust. It also creates a powerful commitment to mutual learning and a partnership for discovering the next steps.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the role of a Transformational Coach.
  • Identify the elements of Transformational Coaching.
  • Identify the four primary communication styles.
  • Learn the process of reaching high-quality coaching decisions.
  • Model the essential skills for effective coaching.

PJJM - Developing a Successful GPS Offender Tracking Program
Teacher: George Drake

Course Description
The use of electronic equipment to track the location of offenders is utilized in nearly every state in the US and is expanding rapidly to international markets. Except for limited training offered by vendors, correctional and law enforcement employees often receive no expert training on how to operate a successful offender tracking program. While giving students a basic understanding of the technology, the course will teach students how to structure a program, select participants, develop appropriate response protocols and evaluate the success of the program.

Learning Objectives

  • The student will be able to identify the components of an electronic offender tracking system and define the nomenclature used for the types of tracking methodologies currently used.
  • The student will be able to list four critical responsibilities of an EM Program Manager.
  • The student will be able to recite two or more limitations of the technology and discuss how these limitations may impact the offender selection process.
  • The student will be able to draft an appropriate response protocol and understand the costs associated with an around-the-clock response commitment.
  • The student will be able to use the Electronic Monitoring Resource Center website and become familiar with other valuable tools related to offender tracking programs.

PJJM - Drug Detection Technologies
Teacher: George Drake

Course Description
There are many emerging technologies that can be used to assist agencies in detecting illicit substance abuse among offenders under supervision. This course is designed to help the student learn about these new approaches and to understand how using multiple technologies can reduce the costs to their program.

Learning Objectives

  • The student will be able to define “the detection window” and will know how it applies to each of the technologies discussed.
  • The student will be able to list ten different methodologies available to criminal justice agencies for detecting drugs and alcohol.
  • A brief explanation of the technologies will be given.
  • The student will be able to describe the reliability of each approach and discuss some counter measures commonly employed by offenders to avoid the detection of their illicit substance use.
  • The student will be able to list the technologies that can be used in court for violation proceedings and the ones that are simply designed to be indicators of possible substance abuse.
  • The student will be able to discuss how a reduction of a program’s drug testing costs can be realized by using a combination of technologies.

PJJM - Dual Diagnosis
Teacher: Becky Brewer, PhD, MSW, LISW

Course Description
An Introduction to Dual Diagnosis covering Historical vs. contemporary treatment of dually diagnosed clients, Substance-Use Disorders, recognizing the  symptoms of psychiatric disorders commonly found among the dually-diagnosed population, recognizing the significant overlaps between symptoms of mental illness and substance abuse, and understanding the differences between cases of mental health diagnosis, substance use diagnosis, dual diagnosis, and substance-induced diagnosis.

Learning Objectives

  • Define dual diagnosis
  • Explain the Historical vs. contemporary treatment of dually diagnosed clients
  • Understand the difference between Substance Abuse and Substance Dependence
  • Understand and know diagnostic specifiers used when diagnosing substance-use disorders
  • Recognize symptoms of use, intoxication and withdrawal from commonly used substances (alcohol, amphetamines, cannabis, cocaine, opiates)
  • Recognize the significant overlaps between symptoms of mental illness and substance abuse, and to know common mistakes made in diagnosis due to this overlap
  • Understand the differences between cases of mental health diagnosis, substance use diagnosis, dual diagnosis, and substance-induced diagnosis

 

 


PJJM - Elements Of A Successful: Home-Detention (Radio Frequency) Program
Teacher: George Drake

 

Course Description
The use of electronic equipment to monitor offenders in home detention has become commonplace in most criminal justice agencies across the nation. Except for limited training offered by vendors, correctional and law enforcement employees often receive no expert training on how to operate a home detention (radio frequency) program. This course will help students obtain a basic understanding of the equipment, help them understand the alerts that a system should generate, develop appropriate response protocols and show the importance of evaluating the success of the program.

 

Learning Objectives

  • The student will be able to name the pioneers of the home detention technology.
  • The student will be able to identify the components of a home detention (RF) system and understand nomenclature used in the industry.
  • The student will be able to list ten alerts that are typically generated by a home detention system.
  • The student will be able to draft an appropriate response protocol and understand the costs associated with an around-the-clock response commitment.
  • The student will be able to list seven commonly overlooked costs associated with a home detention program.
  • The student will be able to discuss the limitations of an offender pay approach of funding a home detention program.

 


PJJM - Ethical Reasoning: Tools For Making Ethical Decisions
Teacher: Felicia Cohn, PH.D.

Course Description
This course will introduce students to tools for ethical reasoning and decision making in their work in community-based corrections. Particular attention will be paid to identifying values, recognizing ethical questions and dilemmas, and analyzing ethical issues.

 

Learning Objectives 

  • Define ethics, morality, and values
  • Identify and acknowledge your personal moral values
  • Consider professional codes of ethics
  • Consider professional ethical questions and dilemmas
  • Identify several theories and methods for analyzing ethical issues
  • Practice ethical decision making through case analysis

PJJM - Grant Writing Essentials
Teacher: Zakiya Khalfani

Course Description
Grant writing is essential to maintaining and operating a successful organization and is an important asset to anyone working in school districts and nonprofit and community agencies. Winning a grant takes more than an idea and a funding source. It takes an organization that is managed well, that understands its purpose, and that makes efficient use of its staff and board. A successful grant program requires the organization to identify its long- and short-term goals, the priorities of the proposed project, and the strengths and limitations of its staff and their procedures.

Learning Objectives

  • Each participant will be able identify the most common types of grants.
  • Each participant will learn the components of grant proposals.
  • Each participant will learn organizational skills to complete the grant process.
  • Each student will learn the applicability of the short grant proposal.
  • Each participant will have at his or her disposal a glossary of grant-writing terms.

PJJM - Grant Writing: Getting the Money and Getting the Most for Your Money
Teacher: Louis G. Biondi, MBPA

Course Description
This course is will provide the student with an understanding of the purposes of government agencies and foundations in issuing grants to support programs within the juvenile justice area. It will also provide guidance in how to respond to grant program announcements, beginning with the decision-making process whether or not to submit an application, through using a final checklist before submitting an application. The course will be useful in developing grant applications in response to grant program announcements as well as unsolicited grant applications.  The course will help you identify primary funding sources and types of grants using the Internet, including the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), other Office of Justice Assistance offices, state criminal justice granting agencies, and agencies outside of the Department of Justice.  Finally, the course provides some useful tips in allocating pages to a topic area when there is a page limit for applications and dealing with performance measure, which are included in more and more federal grant programs.

Learning Objectives

  • Define the purposes and types of grant programs..
  • Analyze a program announcement prior to making the decision to develop an application.
  • Use the Internet to Identify sources of grant programs and track grant program announcements on a regular basis.
  • Identify the relationship between the budgeting and planning process.
  • Better identify those areas which are critical to the purposes of the government agency or foundation funding the grant program.
  • Understand the importance of and how to address performance measures when writing a grant application.
  • Use a final check list after writing the application and before its submission to ensure that the application receives full consideration.

PJJM - IMPLEMENTING EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES in Community Corrections
Teacher: Michael E. Noyes, Ph.D.

Course Description
Module One - Introduction to Evidence Based Practice: What is it?
This module will focus on introducing the primary tenets of Evidence Based-Practice and the “why” to measuring what we do in probation.

Module Two – The Importance of Assessing Probation Client “risk” and their treatment / service needs and its relationship to Evidence-Based Practice.
This module will explore “what is?” probation client risk, how or why it is measured and its relationship to community corrections and Evidence Based Practice.


PJJM - Inter-Agency Collaboration
Teacher: Michael E. Noyes, Ph.D.

Course Description
Module One – Inter-Agency Cooperation:
The Criminal Justice Coordinating Committee or Criminal Justice Advisory Board Model. This module will focus on an introduction to the Criminal Justice Coordinating Council or Criminal Justice Advisory Board as a model template for improving and maximizing inter-agency collaboration.

Module Two – Exploring Criminal Justice Coordinating Committees or Criminal Justice Advisory Boards from across the United States. This module will review a number of active Criminal Justice Coordinating Committees or Criminal Justice Advisory Boards from across the United States and compare and contrast their operational premises, mission statements, effectiveness or those barriers limiting effectiveness.


PJJM - Introduction To Program Evaluation: Determining What Works
Teacher: Alvin Cohn, D.Crim

Course Description
This course is concerned with understanding the issues, role, and process of developing and implementing program evaluations. The course is not designed to turn students into qualified methodologists. Instead, it will acquaint students about the different kinds of evaluation efforts, problems associated with evaluation design and process, and the role – and limits - of the researcher. The degree to which explicit program goals and objectives, standards, and reasons for the evaluation are linked to the evaluation process will be explored. Students will examine the difficulties both in mounting a program evaluation effort and any reports that may be written as a consequence of the research effort. The significance of the phase if you don’t count it, you can’t measure it will be explored in detail.

Learning Objectives

  • Define what is meant by “program evaluation.”
  • Identify what a program evaluation is designed to measure and/or accomplish.
  • Identify the differences between manifest and latent goals related to programming.
  • Relate the relationship of program evaluation to standards.
  • List the primary tasks of an evaluation effort.
  • Define the differences between process and impact evaluations.
  • Define the differences between summative and formative evaluations.
  • Define what is meant by a cost-benefit analysis.

PJJM - Leadership
Teacher: Zakiya Khalfani

Course Description
Good leaders are made, not born. If you have the desire and willpower, you can become an effective leader. Good leaders develop through a never-ending process of self-study, education, training, and experience. This course will help you through that process. To inspire your workers into higher levels of teamwork, there are certain things you must be, know, and, do. These do not come naturally but are acquired through continual work and study. Good leaders are continually working and studying to improve their leadership skills. In this course, you will learn what leadership is, identify leadership styles, and define your leadership attitude and vision. The second half of this course will explore the many competencies of great leaders. You will learn five competencies of leadership, based on 30 years of research.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain why credibility is the foundation of leadership.
  • Provide a behavioral example of credible leadership.
  • Define leadership styles.
  • Identify how attitudes dictate the work environment.
  • Engage others in conversation about their visions.
  • Show constituents how their long-term interests can be realized by enlisting others in a common vision.

 


PJJM - Media Relations in the Workplace for the Professional Juvenile Justice Supervisor
Teacher: Janeé Pelletier, CMP

 

Course Description
This survey of media relations in the workplace is designed to equip juvenile justice personnel with a practical set of skills to increase self-confidence and effectiveness when interacting with members of the print or web media. Major topics include differentiating between inbound and outbound media relations, developing standard responses to routine media inquiries, interviewing techniques, cultivating media contacts, and creating a media communications plan.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand media relations as it relates to his/her specific job function.
  • Describe the difference between inbound and outbound media relations and identify when each might be used.
  • Develop a set of standard responses for routine media inquiries.
  • Demonstrate increased self-confidence and competency to respond to unsolicited media inquiries.
  • Conduct a professional media interview.
  • Develop a media contact list appropriate for his/her role and geographic location.
  • Write and disseminate a descriptive, concise, and locally focused press release.
  • Engage in appropriate follow-up activities to encourage favorable media coverage.

PJJM - Mentoring
Teacher: Zakiya Khalfani

Course Description
Mentoring is an opportunity to help a person grow through discovery. It requires effective development of activities and projects related to current and future performance expectations. Mentoring requires the unique ability to recognize potential skill and ability in others that is worthy of development. A good mentor possesses an innate ability to motivate and inspire others to achieve their goals. Effective mentors have the ability, the knowledge, and the sensitivity to generate an adaptive style according to the individual and circumstances at hand. This course will concentrate on these critical elements and key characteristics of becoming an effective mentor. At the successful conclusion of this course, each student will be able to apply these principles and become an effective mentor.

Learning Objectives

  • The student will learn the difference between mentoring and coaching.
  • The student will learn mentoring behaviors to adopt or avoid.
  • The student will develop an understanding of how mentoring works in today’s workplace.
  • The student will be able to maintain a quality mentoring relationship.

PJJM - Probation: Is Probation an Effective Community-Based Sentence?
Teacher: Alvin Cohn, D.Crim

Course Description
This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the role and function of probation services in the United States. The history of probation will be reviewed. Probation will be described as both a sentence and a process, which means that issues concerning organizational structure, services, statutory authority, and probation officer activities will be discussed and reviewed. Trends in probation; the significance of evidenced-based programming; issues concerning the intake and diversions processes; and the significance of program design and evaluation will be discussed and reviewed.

Learning Objectives

  • Define probation.
  • List at least three (3) precursor events that led to probation in the United States.
  • Describe probation structures as explained in the “lecture.”
  • Describe three (3) variables that remain constant concerning structure and services of probation.
  • List at least three (3) factors that influence judicial sentencing.
  • Define the role and structure of Presentence Investigation (Social History) Reports.
  • Define what is meant by probation “terms and conditions.”

PJJM - Punishment: Who Is Legally Able To Do What To Whom?
Teacher: Alvin Cohn, D.Crim

Course Description
This course is concerned with providing the student with an understanding of the history, concepts, and practices of criminal punishment. It will explore the reasons why the state (and only the state) administers punishment to those who deviate from societal norms from both utilitarian and nonutilitarian perspectives. The roles of rehabilitation and community corrections as they relate to criminal punishment will be reviewed and explained especially as they may or may not have an impact on recidivism. The “derivative” power of persons working in the field of justice administration, other than judges, to administer punishment will be explored.

 Learning Objectives

  • Define criminal punishment
  • Identify the difference between punishment and criminal punishment
  • Explain the role of the state in administering punishment
  • List at least three (3) historical developments that have influenced contemporary criminal punishment
  • Define the differences between utilitarian and nonutilitarian concepts of punishment
  • Define the relationship between rehabilitation and punishment
  • Define the role of community corrections as this relates to punishment

PJJM - Team Building
Teacher: Zakiya Khalfani

Course Description
Team building is not a one-day offsite activity. Rather, it is a series of activities designed to motivate employees to complete tasks as a team. To do this, the supervisor or manager must successfully identify the 10 characteristics of a well-functioning team. The supervisor must develop a skill set in motivating his or her employees to ensure that all team members have the “big picture” or global understanding of the project at hand. Before you can build a cohesive team, individual team members must understand their own values and ways to connect with others. In this course, the student will learn skills to communicate more effectively to minimize misunderstandings and conflict and build a sense of value to the project. The student will take his or her individual strengths to build group identity. He or she will learn to create a team mission statement, ground rules, and a plan to foster trust and morale that will lead the team to success.

Learning Objectives

  • The student will learn guidelines for establishing an effective team.
  • The student will identify the 10 characteristics of a well-functioning team.
  • The student will learn the components of an effective team mission statement.
  • The student will learn five keys to motivating employees.
  • The student will learn interpersonal communication skills.

PJJM - The Performance Management Continuum
Teacher: Dale McCoy

Course Description
The Performance Management Continuum is an attempt to provide you with a clear set of principles and practices that will enable you to manage your workforce more effectively by bringing out the best in your staff while correcting performance that is less than acceptable. In these five modules, you will have an opportunity to take stock of your current set of management tools and acquire new ones. You will learn how you can make your work life easier by setting clear expectations for employees, then responding appropriately to reinforce the behavior and results you want to see more of, or constructively mitigating behaviors that are counter-productive.

Learning Objectives

  • Provide examples of workplace behaviors and where those behaviors fall on the Performance Management Continuum.
  • Determine appropriate response to workplace behaviors that meet, fail to meet, or exceed performance expectations.
  • Identify the four situations in which it is important to clearly and effectively set performance expectations.
  • Describe and apply the five keys for effectively setting performance expectations.
  • Explain the difference between rewards and recognition, and identify when to use each or both in combination.
  • Create and deliver a Three-Part Recognition Statement.
  • Identify the five most-common feedback mistakes.
  • Distinguish differences between constructive feedback and other types of feedback such as criticism or advice.
  • Create a P.O.I.N.T! constructive feedback message, deliver it to someone back on the job, then post a description of the event in a Forum.
  • List examples of “downhill behaviors” and “one time is once too many” behaviors,” and explain differences between the two.

PJJM - Time Management
Teacher: Melissa Pitts-Cutler

Course Description
This course is twofold. The student will first be challenged to examine himself or herself and his or her intrinsic motivations. To that end, the student will be required to perform an activity before beginning the reading material and periodically throughout the first half of the lesson. The reason for this requirement is that an understanding of personal traits and values affects one’s job performance just as much as understanding and possessing the necessary skills and abilities to do the job. The activities are designed to accomplish the desired level of self-evaluation and understanding needed as a foundation on which to apply the more practical tools that facilitate time management.

Once the self-examination is completed, the student will then be provided fundamental principles to properly organize and prioritize his or her work. The emphasis is not only on altering one’s actions but also on understanding and deciding whether one can and will adjust one’s thoughts and values so that new behaviors can be instilled. If the student is diligent with the first portion of the material and exercises, it will greatly enhance what he or she gains from the material and most certainly enable the student to improve his or her ability to effectively manage the time spent fulfilling work responsibilities.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify personal thinking errors regarding time management.
  • Identity salient motivational factors in your life.
  • Identify a minimum of three career goals.
  • Identify a minimum of three personal goals.
  • Implement the appropriate practical tools to assist with managing time.
  • Define the four ways work is prioritized.
  • Cause a paradigm shift toward working more effectively.

PJJM - Working With Culturally Diverse Staff  Teacher: George Tsagaris, Ph.D., L.I.S.W., M.S.

 

 Course Description
Working with Culturally Diverse Staff is a follow-up course to the PJJM course - Staff Supervision and Staff Development, which is an introductory and core course in the PJJM curriculum. It is viewed as an important and crucial elective in the PJJM Program. This online course focuses on the requirements of new and current supervisors who must be come culturally competent in working with diverse staff in today’s pluralistic workplace in the juvenile justice field. Becoming a culturally competent supervisor is an ongoing task, and process.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand and describe their responsibilities as a culturally competent supervisor within a diverse workforce.
  • Apply the culturally responsive and sensitive conditions to effective teaching and learning, as well as adult learning principles in the supervision of employees.
  • Explain the differences between human resources management, staff supervision and staff development, staff motivational leadership and staff performance management.
  • Understanding the culturally barriers to effective teaching and adult learning in staff supervision.
  • Understanding the characteristics of effective learner behaviors, and becoming culturally sensitive in this process.
  • Understand and describe the significance of working with culturally divesre staff in the supervisee and supervisor relationship for staff supervision and staff development.

 


PJJM - Writing A Request For Proposals: Getting What You Want From the Contracting Process 
Teacher: Louis G. Biondi, MBPA

 

Course Description
This course will provide the student with an understanding of the process of developing a request for proposal (RFP), a critical step in the overall contracting process. The course covers the implications of entering into a contractual relationship, which alters the powers and authority of the agency director to hire contractors for products and services. The course also covers the significant differences between contracting for goods or products and contracting for services, including the implications of leasing versus purchasing goods or products. Students will learn the steps that need to be taken in organizing a contract team that will have input into the RFP and gathering information from other sources that will help in developing a quality RFP. The course will guide students through the process of defining the requirements for the products or services being sought by their agency, setting priorities for those requirements, and developing measures to assess the contractor’s performance once the contract is awarded. Finally, the course will cover developing the RFP, offering both general guidance and recommendations for those sections that should be included in most RFPs and the format of the RFP.

Learning Objectives

  • Define the purposes of using an RFP and the implications of contracting versus using in-house resources
  • Determine whether a lease agreement contract or purchase contract is the most appropriate vehicle for obtaining products
  • Understand the process of establishing the requirements for the product or services that they plan to acquire through the RFP process

 

 



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